Getting through the first year of losing your partner is a bit like a roller coaster. You might be plunged into the depths of despair at any given moment.You may burst into tears in the supermarket when trying to work out what to cook for supper that night. Day by day, you start to get used to the practicalities of your new life as the realisation that your partner is not coming back really begins to hit home.

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You don’t ‘get over’ the man, though you do after a year or two get over the death; but you have to learn to live in another country in which you’re an unwilling refugee.” After six months or so, friends and family who have supported you through the first difficult months might start to drift away and get on with their own lives – thinking that the worst should surely now be over.

Your grief will begin to settle a bit like a stone in the bottom of your stomach.

But then along comes the first anniversary like an enormous boulder to rub salt into the wound that is probably just beginning to heal.

And as you tip into the second year, the daily grind can be even more difficult to bear –making you even more painfully aware of how much your miss your partner being around. But slowly, imperceptibly, each day will start to get a little bit easier.

Some days you might even wake up and begin to feel happy again.

Eventually, you might find yourself starting to look forward rather than dwelling on the past.

You will probably begin to feel like socialising again after months of not being able to face anyone except your closest friends and family.

That’s when it becomes really helpful to join an organisation like WAY, which can provide a new social network after your old ones begin to shift and change in the aftermath of bereavement.

WAY has events and gatherings across the country – giving members the chance to meet up with other people who understand exactly what you’re going through.